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Is Beer Pong the Official Sport of the Barracks

Beer
Beer
Daniel
January 15, 2023
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A tradition passed down from generation to generation of disgruntled E4s, beer pong is a beloved pastime. Played in backyards of random half-standing houses off base, disgusting frat basements, and privately in the most exciting room of the barracks. 

Though maybe considered to be a nothing activity, any type of talent can be capitalized off of these days. The games will showcase the best of the best keeping a steady hand while getting drunk off their ass. 

Though drinking games are often associated with the military, due to the nature of the culture, beer pong belongs to the college kids. (sorry, but the good idea fairies were good for something…for once.) 

Beer pong originated in Dartmouth college around the 50’s and 60’s. Originally it was a game similar to ping pong, hence the evolution of the game including the same ball. The game is what it is today thanks to a few fraternity brothers from Bucknell, calling it “throw pong,” who visited Lehigh college. The rest is relative history…

Though the sport can be played by anyone, there are a few in the crowd who stand out. They may be a student athlete, a random tank mechanic, a plastered ROTC cadet, but they all have one thing in common. They’re superstitious as hell. The superstitions of this sport are just as important to the game as having an IPA in your hand. 

Common good luck charms include getting the pretty girl you may have eyes for to give your ball a kiss before you toss it, which side they pick to shoot from the table, lucky shirts, shoes, hats etc. Other traditions include bouncing the ball a specific number of times before shooting it, tapping the cups a set number of times, or just a specific drink of choice. 

Enlisted troops all over the nation have found ways to store their designated table in their barracks. Sometimes, they have to hide it creatively to pass room inspections. Other times, they are stored in laundry rooms or common spaces. Either way, when the work week ends, the cups are filled, and the balls get wet. 

About the author: Samantha Harvill graduated, with honors, from the University of Pittsburgh with a Bachelors of Science in Emergency Medicine and was recently commissioned as a Lieutenant in the US Army Reserves. She is an avid runner, and is currently training for her next marathon.

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