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Top (and worst) States for Fire and Rescue Pay

First Responders
First Responders
Community Support
Community Support
September 1, 2022
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Many separating from the military long for a job with a similar sense of camaraderie. Some also seek a sense of purpose while serving their community. While these are noble goals, it is still a necessity to provide for your family. 

Here is a list of the top four states that hold the highest salaries for Fire and EMS (EMT and paramedic) respectfully. All annual wages are reported on an average basis, and pulled from multiple job seeking sources.

Fire 

-       Ohio: $52,530 annually.

-       Texas: $53,310 annually.

-       Florida: $53,480 annually.

-       California: $80,990 annually. 

EMTs 

-       New York: $51,505 annually. 

-       Massachusetts: $51,591 annually.

-       Connecticut: $53,789 annually.

-       New Jersey: $54,185 annually.

Paramedics 

-       Alaska: $50,030 annually.

-       Maryland: $53,440 annually.

-       Washington: $56,910 annually.

-       Hawaii: $58,580 annually. 

Lowest paying state for these careers is Mississippi for Fire, EMTs, and paramedics, at $30,690, $19,826, and $32,480 annually, respectively.

Though these average pays may look enticing, don’t be fooled. They can be even better, or wildly worse. Many EMS providers who work full time work with multiple agencies to make ends meet. You may have also noticed there was no one state that pays the highest average in all categories.

More to consider

Fire gets federal funding through the state, which EMS does not. Firefighters can also sometimes depend on a pension after the years of work that they put into their service. 

Another factor to consider is the level of violence against first responders in that region. Furthermore, if that state is prone to wildfires, or natural disasters. These occurrences may not dissuade you, but are important to consider.

While money is not the most important thing in the world, no first responder should have to struggle to take care of their family.

About the author: Samantha Harvill graduated, with honors, from the University of Pittsburgh with a Bachelors of Science in Emergency Medicine and was recently commissioned as a Lieutenant in the US Army Reserves. She is an avid runner, and is currently training for her next marathon.
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